Farah Lawal

Reviews

On American Century Theater's Native Son

"Farah Lawal brings unexpected tenderness and devotion to Bigger's lover, Clara."
-The Washington Post

"Farah Lawal is moving as his devoted girlfriend."
-The Washington Examiner






On Farah Lawal's One-Woman Show,
So Do You Love Me Yet?

"There’s more beauty than horror here, and not just because writer-performer Farah Lawal is an ingratiating presence onstage. (Though she’s certainly ingratiating — lovely, with a smile that’s sunny and sly by turns, and a talker confident enough to suggest some time spent on slam-poetry stages.) And not just because the evening’s string of matte-finish performance poems...offers more meditations in the mode of hopeful...than it does in the key of despair."
-Washington City Paper

"Lawal can sling sass when it’s called for — you don’t want to be the guy about whom a woman writes a scornful, clean-lined bit of blank verse titled ‘Booty Call,’ do you? — and though she can certainly dial up the darkness effectively."
-Washington City Paper

"Farah Lawal’s spoken-word poetry breathes new life into a topic worn-thin in almost every medium."
-DC Theatre Scene

"Lawal’s lyrical explorations of the themes close to every woman’s heart resonated with the audience sitting in the tiny space...as we all found something familiar in her inspiring words."
-DC Theatre Scene

"The piece flows enjoyably from one topic to another...The audience clucked and nodded
along to recognizable circumstances, infused with both clever humor...and wise introspective empowerment..."
-DC Theatre Scene

"Lawal continues in a diverse range of voices. There are humorous and painful moments..."
-DC Theatre Scene

"Lawal aids us in that search with her thoughtful and exquisite voice."
-DC Theatre Scene

On The Saartjie Project's Four Women

"Each of the seven writer/performers brings a special flair to the text, performance and roles...Farah Lawal’s writing has a tough authenticity."
-DC Theatre Scene

"The abundance of material offered sparkling fresh perspectives, and the inclusion of group montages and movement added an enticing energy."
-DC Theatre Scene


On The Saartjie Project's
Deconstructing the Myth of the Booty

"The poetry and monologues tend to hit faster and harder. One woman [Farah Lawal] tells about the white man who came onto her (generically, saying he'd never been with a black woman), which inspires a long, fascinating riff as she imagines what, precisely, the attractions would have been for him."
-The Washington Post
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